Wilf Deckner

Postscript to a Referendum

(In Memoriam Jo Cox MP, 1974 – 2016)

“I saw the darkness rising from afar,”
Max Herrmann-Neisse: Damnation 1933

At the Nuremberg Trials in 1946,
Edgar Faure, a prosecutor for the allies,
Named the great lure that Fascism held out
To the powerless and poor in Germany.

All of a sudden it was no longer them,
Who were the dregs of their society. Instead
They had been given a new under-class
Of human beings, to persecute and to maltreat.

Fast forward through the seven decades since,
To the campaign for exiting from Europe.
The self-same lies are peddled to new losers,
Their bigotry a substitute for any knowledge.

Simply for being British-born, they’re offered
A whole new under-class of human beings
To blame for any grievances or problems,
Instead of facing what their own failings are.

This exit makes of migrants the Jews of our time.
As we judge Germans by what their fathers did,
This generation will be judged for choosing
To reject the lessons of Jo Cox’s life and death

 

Wilf Deckner was born in 1952 in Northern Germany and came to this country over 40 years ago. He was educated at the universities of Manchester and Oxford, and has worked in a variety of jobs before and after. For the past twenty-odd years he worked in the Somerset Library Service and now works as an assistant at the Somerset Heritage Centre. He has been writing poems for the past 35 years but remains largely unpublished, with the recent exception of a 15 poem sequence as a critical response to some aspects of the 1914 centenary, entitled “What Somerset Remembers, What Somerset Forgets”,

Wilf Deckner was born in 1952 in Northern Germany and came to this country over 40 years ago. He was educated at the universities of
Manchester and Oxford, and has worked in a variety of jobs before and after. For the pasttwenty-odd years he worked in the Somerset
Library Service and now works as an assistantat the Somerset Heritage Centre. He has been writing poems for the past 35 years but remains
largely unpublished, with the recent exception of a 15 poem sequence as a critical response tosome aspects of the 1914 centenary, entitled “What Somerset Remembers, What Somerset Forgets”